Asset Protection in Texas

Little Known Facts About Medicaid and Your Home – And Why They Matter

I helped a couple today from Irving, Texas.  It’s a really sad story.   Betty has Alzheimer’s and has moved in with her brother and his family.  Before moving in with her brother, Betty got some really bad advice.  She had heard that in order to qualify for Medicaid and to have Medicaid pay for her nursing home care, she couldn’t own a residence in her name.  So, she deeded her residence to her son, Larry and daughter-in-law, Rachel.  A few years ago, the Larry borrowed around $500,000 from a local bank to start a new business in Dallas.  The bank required that Larry and Rachel both personally guarantee the loan, which they did.  The business recently stopped making payments on the bank note and closed its doors.  In order to protect their assets from the bank’s collection on the personal guarantee, Larry and Rachel had to file personal bankruptcy.  Since Betty’s house is now in Larry’s and Rachel’s name, it has become an asset of their bankruptcy estate and will likely be foreclosed upon to pay the bank.

Had Betty consulted with us, we would have advised her against deeding her home to Larry and Rachel for the very reasons that occurred.  There are several ways that she could have qualified for Medicaid and maintained control and ownership of her home.  Most of them involve the use of Trusts.

If you are interested in learning more about protecting your assets and your home while qualifying for Medicaid, contact us for an appointment.

A Texas Family Avoids an Estate Planning Nightmare

I met with a family from Garland, Texas today.  They were very emotional in telling me a story about a close family friend, Bob, spending his life savings on long-term nursing home care.  Bob has Alzheimer’s and no longer recognizes his family.  They estimated that Bob had spent around $400,000 thus far and that since his condition is worsening, they assumed that the remainder of Bob’s savings would be consumed by his nursing home expenses.

The family wanted to make sure that Bob’s situation doesn’t happen to them.  Their house is paid for and they have an IRA worth around $225,000 along with some savings and some stocks.  They know that they could not be forced to sell the home to pay for their nursing home costs, but that Medicaid can and will lien their home so that they can reimburse themselves for whatever nursing home expenses they pay on their behalves.

We introduced several options available to them and after discussions, we set up a Trust to protect their home and life savings from nursing home expenses. They were surprised how simple and easy it was to protect their assets. One of the key components, though, was their timing. You can’t set up the protections and expect them to work properly if you are on your way to checking-in to the nursing home.  The key is to get your Trust and planning in place while you are still relatively healthy.  It’s not really “planning” if you wait until you are on the doorstep of the nursing home.  In fact, it’s usually too late at that point.  

The family has the peace of mind of knowing that their assets, their home and their belongings are going to wind-up with their children and not go towards paying for nursing home expenses.  Few people have that luxury.  

They were also pleased to find out that since their assets are going to be placed in Trust, they are “doubly” protected from the probate process when they die.  In other words, the Trust avoids losing their assets to the nursing homes AND after they both pass away, their children won’t have to deal with lawyers, judges or courtrooms in order to have access to their parent’s accounts and things.  With their Trust, after the parents both pass away, their children will have access to their assets to pay for funeral expenses and to distribute their belongings and things without the need of lawyers or courts being involved in the process.  Even more peace of mind!

 

You, Me, and Trusts And Red Wagons: The Truth

I helped a man from Plano, Texas today.  He was in our office and wanted to know how Trusts work.  I gave him a quick demonstration using a little red wagon that I keep in our conference room.  The wagon represents the Trust entity itself.   I have several matchbooks that represent a family’s assets (house, car, bank accounts, savings accounts, etc.).  I placed the matchbooks inside the wagon (to represent the re-titling and trust ownership of the assets) and rolled it around the conference room floor to emphasize the mobility and portability of the Trust.  I explained that as long as the assets are inside the trust, they are protected from predators like lawsuits, Probate and the claims of Nursing Homes.  Then I took some of the matchbooks out of the wagon and placed them on the table to demonstrate how the owner maintains control over the assets.  I also indicated, though, that once the matchbooks (assets) were outside of the wagon, they were no longer protected from lawsuits, probate and Nursing Homes.  In the bed of the wagon is a set of instructions that lets everyone know how the trust is to be operated.  I closed my demonstration by explaining to my newest client that trusts aren’t just for the rich anymore.  They are for anyone that wants to protect assets for their families.

That’s a very simple explanation of Trusts.  They can be very complicated but the basics remain the same:  protection and control of family assets.